The images you'll see as you scroll down to the current text are all part of the story telling in my novel, Realms of Gold:Ritual to Romance.

Bianca Caldwell, pen name, Bianca Fiore, is a writer for an art magazine. In each of her monthly stories she describes an object used in ancient ritual.

Celtic Gold: Torques

The quality and type of metal, whether gold, silver, iron, or bronze seems to have had significance not only to mark the social and economic class of the wearer, but also in symbolic and magical ways. Silver, long associated with the moon, was the most commonly used metal for Celtic torques and bracelets. Gold, very rare and precious in the centuries BCE, was reserved for not only the wealthiest members of society, but also the most powerful in a spiritual sense. Gold, due to its luster and color, has long been associated with the sun, and by extension, the vitality of the life force itself.

Gold Celtic torc with three "balusters" and decoration including animals, found in Glauberg, Germany, 400 BC

The Newark Torc discovered near Newark, Nottinghamshire, in Coritani territory, and probably worn by a Coritani prince or king between 100-50 BC

Evidence points to the evolution of Celtic bracelets from unique, ornate, and symbolically powerful items called “torques.” Torques were crafted most often from silver or gold. They were perfectly circular and probably fit fairly tightly around the neck of warriors, priests, and noblewomen. As elaborate status symbols, torques were thought to contain the power to ward off the curses of enemies and maleficent sorcerers, as well as to provide protection and courage during battle. Torques symbolically represented essential aspects of a Celt’s relationship to his community and the universe as a whole.  Read more

 Celtic Neck Ring Gold Made 500-300 BCE, Metropolitan Museum of Art